Medical Weight Loss Clinic Minute with Paul S.

20 Feb

Medical Weight Loss Clinic Flint patient Paul Spaniola shares why he chose MWLC and his own personal success story with Tracy Strieter and WEYI NBC 25 and WSMH Fox 66 viewers.

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MWLC Goes RED!

2 Feb

Medical Weight Loss Clinic goes RED!  Betty Boop is helping educate about the signs of stroke – F.A.S.T. #goredmi

What does this mean?

Signs that you may be having a stroke from www.goredwomen.org:

  1. Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body
  2. Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding
  3. Sudden trouble seeing or blurred vision in one or both eyes
  4. Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination
  5. Sudden severe headache with no known cause

You should never wait more than five minutes to dial 9-1-1 if you experience even one of the signs above. Remember, you could be having a stroke even if you’re not experiencing all of the symptoms. And remember to check the time. The responding emergency medical technician or ER nurse at the hospital will need to know when the first symptom occurred.

FAST2

 

 

 

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8 Tips to Combat Seasonal Affective Disorder

1 Jan

Many people tend to feel a little down during the colder winter months, but if you feel true depression around this time of year every year, you may have Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD).  This is more than just “winter blues”.  SAD can leave you feeling irritable, losing interest in usual activities, making unhealthy eating choices and sleeping more but still feeling lethargic.  Left untreated, SAD can lead to other mental health disorders.  If you are feeling a little blue or suffering from Seasonal Affected Disorder, try these tips to boost your spirits.

Image result for winter blues

  1. Plants– Bring the outdoors inside with some potted plants to liven up your home or office with a splash of color. Studies have shown that plants can reduce feelings of anxiety and blood pressure while increasing attentiveness and productivity.
  2. Aromatherapy– Essential oils can be used for a variety of natural healing capabilities from calming anxiety to lifting your mood and helping you sleep. Add a couple drops of lavender or roman chamomile essential oil to your bath, pillow, pulse points or essential oil diffuser for a positive effect.
  3. Exercise– While working out has many benefits, one of the best is that it reduces stress and can improve blood pressure. Working out consistently can also leave you feeling more energetic during the day and improve the quality of your sleep. Exercising also releases endorphins, a mood booster made by our bodies.
  4. Make a schedule– Create a routine for yourself and stick to it. It may be tempting to stay in bed later as the mornings get darker, but by getting up at a regular time you’ll keep your circadian rhythm on track so you’re tired at night and alert in the morning.
  5. Take a vacation– If you don’t have the luxury to get away to a warm, sunny place, plan a day trip or a staycation. Take a vacation from the week with a mental health day to reduce stress and rejuvenate.
  6. Get your Vitamin D– In the winter you are likely to experience a vitamin D deficiency, as you are spending less time in the sun. Studies show that SAD is linked to the drop in vitamin D, affecting the serotonin levels. Resupply your vitamin D with supplements or take a walk during your lunch break. If you’re unable to get outside, consider a light therapy box, to activate the brain and help restore your circadian rhythm.
  7. Start a journal– Writing down your thoughts and feelings is a good way to solve problems and cope with stressful situations. Try writing down events from the day and reflect on them.
  8. Stick to a healthy diet– When you’re feeling down, you likely gravitate towards eating more refined carbohydrates—they boost levels of serotonin, which makes you feel happy. But while they make you feel good, they’re high in calories and often have little nutritional value. Trade pasta and pizza for leafy greens or fish which can help ease depression symptoms.

If you feel your symptoms are not improving or getting worse, see your primary care physician to discuss further treatment options. Reach out to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline online or call 1-800-273-8255 if you being to experience suicidal thoughts.

 

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A Guide to Cooking With Your Children

28 Dec

Develop your child’s interest in healthy eating by getting them involved in the kitchen.  Cooking at a young age can ignite a passion for watching what they eat and creating healthy meals – healthy skills they can take into adulthood.  Where to start?  Use this handy guide to see what your kids may be capable of at different ages.

  • Preschoolers (ages 2 to 5): Motor skills are still developing in younger children, so start them off with short, simple tasks. With your supervision, they can carefully mix and stir ingredients, pour liquids and wash fruits and vegetables.
  • School-age children (ages 6 to 8): They can start handling simple kitchen tools like graters and can openers, as well as cutting soft foods with a blunt knife (or if you think they are ready, you can introduce a sharper knife). Be sure to supervise them and show them safety tips, like how to form their hand into a claw to keep fingertips out of danger and when to stop as their hand gets close to the grater. They can also start portioning ingredients for recipes with measuring cups and spoons. This can help incorporate math skills into cooking.
  • Preteens (ages 9 to 12): As their confidence grows in the kitchen, they will be able to take on basic recipes, such as cooking eggs. They can also start using kitchen appliances such as the blender and the oven. Discussing the recipes with your children can also help teach them about the science of cooking.
  • Teenagers (ages 13 to 18): At this stage, they should be able to develop more complex skills and take the lead in technical tasks. You can help further their kitchen knowledge by introducing cooking math, such as how to divide food into portions and double recipes. Continue to broaden their horizons by trying new and different ingredient combinations as well as informing them about food safety and storage.

Image result for cooking with kids

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Basic Knife Skills

21 Dec

Courtesy of the New York Times, check out this guide to learn the best ways to choose knives, take care of them and cut almost anything.  These are skills that home cooks consider the easiest and quickest routes to the food you want to cook.  The videos are both inspiring and educational.

Learn how to handle and hold a knifeHow to chop garlic, parsley and carrots.  How to dice onions and tomatoes.  How to slice and cut apples. How to chiffonade basil and how to julienne celery. Test out your new knife skills on some of our MWLC recipes!

https://cooking.nytimes.com/guides/23-basic-knife-skills 

 

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WSYM: Holiday Weight Loss Tips

11 Dec

Did you know that one of the biggest contributors to overeating is stress, and the holidays are a time when people tend to have more stress? Tracy stopped into the Morning blend to talk about ways to beat the effects of holiday stress and how to combat it with our CoQ10 and B-12.

Increased stress causes your body to produce cortisol, a hormone which can increase appetite. A simple fix? Antioxidants found in whole, fresh foods such as berries, peppers, grapes and apples are vital.  Antioxidants are the secret weapon and are the counter measure against holiday stress and increased cortisol.

Medical Weight Loss Clinic also offers powerful antioxidant CoQ10 and chewable B-12 to help. As your stress level rises, CoQ10 is used up faster.   Low CoQ10 levels can create fatigue.

MWLC’s formula is produced from natural source which is identical to the body’s own CoQ10 production. In contrast, many other formulas are made using synthetic CoQ10, which is chemically processed.

MWLC’s B-12 can boost your energy, concentration, memory, and mood – it is one of eight B vitamins that help the body convert the food you eat into glucose, giving your body energy. Together, these products can manage your cortisol and energy levels!

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What Is a Pressure Cooker?

7 Dec

What is a pressure cooker?  How does a pressure cooker work?  Hungry for a home-cooked meal but lacking in the time?  An electric multicooker, which can act as a pressure cooker, slow cooker, rice cooker and steamer can help.  Although the Instant Pot is one of the most popular multicookers on the market, there are other good brands out there as well.  How do you get the most out of your pressure cooker?  Keep reading!

Image result for pressure cooker

What is this multicooker that you speak of?  It’s a pressure cooker, utilizing pressure and heat to prepare food evenly and quickly, usually in a fraction of the time of traditional methods.  It can also function as a slow cooker, allowing you to take your time if you aren’t in such a rush.  It can sauté and steam with a built-in heat source at the bottom of the machine.  This means you can use the pot to sear meats, sauté vegetables, steam rice or even simmer liquids for steaming without using a stove top.

Old style stovetop pressure cookers have a gauge on the lid that pops up as the pressure increases, meaning that the inside of the pot has reached optimal pressure. The heat needs to be adjusted to keep the pot’s temperature and pressure constant to avoid over-pressurizing which can burn the food inside, or in extreme cases, explode.

An electric pressure cooker traps steam rising from the boiling liquid within the pot, which raises the temperature at which that boils.  It can work at different pressure levels with a steam valve that allows excess steam to escape, keeping the pressure cooker from exploding.  It will also turn itself off if the pressure or temperature ever rises too high so it’s another wonderful tool to have in your kitchen that you can set and walk away with little worry.

To use your electric pressure cooker, review your recipe to determine the pressure level – high pressure is used for many recipes, but low pressure is used for more delicate items like seafood, rice or eggs.  Some pressure cookers even have a setting for different proteins.  Set your steam valve and once you set your device, it will begin building pressure (pressure cannot build if the device is venting).  Pressure build up can take up to 20 minutes.

Once the cooking time is up, the multicooker will automatically change to “keep warm” function and begin slowly losing pressure.  It can take up to 30 minutes to release naturally.  The longer the pressure cooker has been on and the more food it has in it, the longer the natural release will take.  If the recipe calls for an immediate manual release, carefully move the steam valve to the venting position and the pressure will release in a minute or so, with a burst of steam.  Keep your hand away from the top of the valve – you may consider using tongs or a wooden spoon to move the valve or covering the valve with a dish towel to keep the steam from spraying all over your kitchen.

If you are tight on space, you can replace your slow cooker and rice cooker with a multicooker since it can handle slow cooking, pressure cooking or steaming methods at the touch of a button.

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7 Tips to Avoid Weight Gain this Holiday Season

1 Dec

The holidays don’t mean you have to gain weight!  Try these 7 tips to help you avoid weight gain while enjoying your favorite holiday festivities.

1. Don’t give up on keeping a journal!  Whether you are trying to lose weight or maintain your weight this holiday season, keeping a detailed journal of your food intake is crucial.  By being aware of what you are eating, you’re more likely to stay on track with your goals, and your journal is one of MWLC’s best tools to help you meal plan and achieve success.

2. Listen to your breathing!  When you sigh or begin to breathe more deeply, your body is telling you it has had enough to eat.  Listen to the cues your body gives you and let it be a guide to help you determine when you’ve had enough to eat.

3. Limit alcohol!  Even the smallest amount of alcohol (for example, wine, beer, and liquor) can directly affect our fat metabolism.  Some studies have even shown that our body can burn around 73% less fat after consuming just one ounce of alcohol!

4. Pay attention to portion control!  Put a small portion on your plate, eat it slowly and savor it.  While you fill your plate, focus on seeing the plate and not over-piling the food.

5.  If you feel like you must eat foods off of your meal plan, rate all holiday foods from 1 to 10, ten being your favorite.  Eat only your 9s or 10s, leaving out foods you do not rate highly.

6. Don’t deprive yourself!   Do not stay home – go, have fun and socialize.  Planning ahead will help make you successful and you will still be able to enjoy yourself.

7. Have a plan!  Arrive at holiday parties and gatherings knowing what you will eat and prepare accordingly.  Bring a dish to pass that you can enjoy and still stick to your meal plan.

Happy Holidays!

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Holiday Survival Tips

28 Nov

The month between Thanksgiving and Christmas can be a challenge when it comes to sticking to a diet.  With this time period being filled with parties, alcohol, and food, here’s some tips to help you survive the holidays!

1. Think and plan ahead. Use a large calendar to record events that will be challenging for you. Schedule rewards for yourself that will enhance your enjoyment for the holidays. (Examples: Manicures, Pedicures, Clothing, Jewelry, Massages, etc.)… No Food!

2. When you do have a party to attend, go there KNOWING what you plan to do about eating (don’t stay home instead of going!)

3. If you are going to a dinner party, ask what is being served (if possible) and plan accordingly.

4. If you will be at a party where hors d’oeuvres will be served, eat before you arrive.

5. Carry an MWLC snack or bar with you at all times (as a back-up).

6. When attending a party, wear clothing that is well fitting (as opposed to loose fitting – comfortable – stretchy).

7. Focus on the friends and/or family that you will be seeing (not the food).  Spend time talking with each and every guest that you know at a party (this will leave little or no time to visit the snacks).

8. If dinner is served “buffet” style, use only one plate and fill it primarily with raw veggies, salad and fruit (foods on plan). Select a small plate if possible. See your plate – don’t pile up or overlap food.

9. Do not eat anything that is served in gravy or sauce.

10. Avoid all food that has been “fried”.

11. Drink at least 64 ounces of water every day throughout the holidays.

Remember that you are making a choice…that you have made a commitment…that you have a plan, and that YOU WANT to be successful!

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