Overweight

Water Intake Crucial for Weight Loss

Udpated: 5/21/18 pitcher

Improving overall hydration is a common tool used in weight loss. How important is your water intake?

A 2016 study, published in the Annals of Family Medicine, found a significant link between inadequate hydration and obesity.

The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between hydration and weight status among U.S. adults, and examined a sample from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2012 to compare hydration levels with BMI.  Urine osmality was used to assess hydration levels, allowing for a more accurate analysis, as this is a more effective measure of hydration levels than water intake alone because it factors in water and solutes consumed from other beverages and foods.  From the sample, about 32% of individuals were considered inadequately hydrated, and were found to have higher BMI's and greater odds of being obese compared to the hydrated adults.

Overall, this study determined a significant association between proper water intake and weight management.  These results emphasize the importance of consuming adequate amounts of water while following a weight loss program.

How much water do you consume in a day?

Original Article Here: http://www.annfammed.org/content/14/4/320.full.pdf+html

Consequences of Childhood Obesity

Updated:  8/22/18 Did you know that today, about one-third of children and adolescents in the United States are considered overweight or obese, and this number continues to rise?  The negative consequences associated with this excess weight in children, ranges from physical to psychological and social.  The impact of obesity in childhood can have life-long effects and lead to a shorter life expectancy, making this an extremely important health issue.

For children and adolescents, adult BMI categories are further divided by sex and age, due to changes that occur during growth and development.  Growth charts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are used to determine children’s BMI.  Children and adolescents with a BMI between the 5th and 85th percentile are considered to be a healthy weight.  Children with a BMI between the 85th and 94th percentiles are generally considered to be overweight, and those with a BMI at or above the sex-and age-specific 95th percentile of the population on this growth chart are typically considered obese.

Overweight and obesity are the result of caloric imbalance (too few calories expended for the amount of calories consumed) and are influenced by genetic, behavioral, and environmental factors.

Childhood overweight and obesity can lead to health consequences into adulthood, and obese children and teens are more likely to become obese adults.  Children who are obese have a greater risk of high blood pressure and high cholesterol, increased risk of impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, sleep apnea and asthma, joint problems, fatty liver disease, gallstones, and heartburn, and psychological issues such as poor self-esteem and depression.

Childhood obesity can be prevented through the actions of children and their parents. Promoting an environment of healthy eating and physical activity for children can help reduce the risk of obesity and the negative consequences that come with this condition.

Sources: https://www.cdc.gov/healthyschools/obesity/facts.htm

and https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/childhood/causes.html